News Updates

Pumpkin Contest ~ Sat, Oct 14th/17 11am...
Campbell River Garden Centre23rd Annual Great Pumpkin Contest October 14th, 2017 1st place Adult Joe Hanrahan 521 lbs2nd Place...
Online Bulb Shopping Begins Sept 15th/...
Once again we have a wonderful selection of bulbs available for fall planting. Lots of new items and lots of specials. If you can't make it into our...
Summer Watering - Water carefully...
Baby, it's hot out there! Watering early in the morning helps plants handle the hot afternoons. Potted plants may require two waterings a day if...

Deer Resistant

Peonies

Peonies bloom from late Spring to early Summer.  They come in an extensive range of colours including many pink shades as well as red, fuchsia, peachy-pink, yellow and white.  They also differ in form; from fully double bomb types to the delicately simple singles and many unique forms in between; such as Peony 'Sorbet' which looks like a delicious scoop of sorbet ice cream on saucer-shaped petals. The lacy foliage of peonies is also quite lovely, enhancing the garden throughout the summer, and finally turning shimmery plum shades in the fall.  Peonies are extremely winter-hardy and deer resistant.

There are three main groups of peonies:-

Garden Peonies (Paeonia lactiflora) these are your granny's mind-blowing, beautiful peonies that grow between two and three feet tall and die back to the ground each fall. Granny would be impressed to see the range of colours and forms available today. All gorgeous! Garden Peonies also make excellent cut flowers so be sure to have a few extra to cut and bring indoors.

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Deer Resistant Spring Bulbs

Deer in the garden is about as hot a topic as it gets! While many gardeners still hold to the gentle nature of gardening; willing to give a bit for Bambi and a bit for ourselves, others have been pushed very close to the edge. I have to admit 'a bit for Bambi' should be only a light nibble before first light but when he or she is back for midnight snacks, every night doing the block, it gets pretty annoying.

For some gardeners it is the fact that Bambi never comes to visit you until your favourite rose is about to bloom, and the next morning you stand in disbelief staring at the gaping hoof prints and whatever sad, torn up canes remain. The odd, small bud left on the ground as the proverbial call sign, Uncle Buck was here! As if you needed any proof. This is usually when it gets ugly. Spouses rush off to work, after all, they've heard it all before and they know nothing can relieve your anguish.

This is when you need the ear of a fellow gardener. Only then will you be heard as a balanced nature lover whose only wish is for nature to fit into your overall garden plan and not the other way around.

How about a list of deer resistant bulbs to get you started. Most gardeners know that the deer generally leave daffodils alone but here are some other bulbs that are quite resistant to midnight raids.

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Proven Winner Osteospermum

Wow! That's the comment most people make when they first see blooming Osteospermums (or Osteos as we like to call them). They really do make a stunning display of colourful daisy-shaped blooms so prolific you can hardly see the foliage.

Osteos bloom from spring to frost and though they are thought of as annuals, they sometimes winter over when they are planted in sheltered locations; such as under the eaves of a west facing wall.

They come in a full range of colours including white, cream, yellow, peach, pink, mauve, purple and orange. Whew! So, what else can I tell you.? Oh yes, the deer don't like them (Yippee!).

They like hot sunny locations and are best in large containers or in the ground because they grow to about 14" in height. They also look great in window boxes and paired up with other Proven Winners such as the creeping verbenas.

One of our customers has planted her window boxes, for the last few years, with Orange Osteos and "Tapien Blue Violet" Verbena, which makes a stunning combination.

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Wisteria

Long racemes of pink, white or most frequently purple flowers drip from the gnarly, twisted vines of Wisteria in mid-May displaying a beautiful combination of masculine and feminine form. The fragrance is delicious and hangs in the air like the flowers themselves, sweet and heady. Soft new tendrils curl all around the edges of the main vines. The overall effect of old growth, new growth, flowers and fragrance is quite simply perfect!

 

The ideal situation for a wisteria is either grown against a solid wall against which it can be espaliered by training it onto wires, or more easily, it can be trained to wrap itself up a sturdy pillar. The pillar should be at least 4" X4" or larger. Wisteria is far too vigorous to be grown on a lattice, and you should keep it clear of vinyl or cedar siding as it can cause damage to these.

 

Any sunny location with at least 6 hours of direct sunshine and well-drained soil will do. Add the usual bone meal, peat moss and manure when planting, followed by plenty of water in the first year. Plant grafted plants as these bloom at an earlier age.

 

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